Monday, July 27, 2009

Learning Japanese - Part 32, Page 6

This is the last of page 6.

汚染物質だらけの生物の死骸の氷つけを巨額の金と血を賭してまで食おうとする連
中があとをたたないのだ

おせんぶっしつ だらけ の せいぶつ の しがい の こおりづけ を きょがく のかね
と ち をとして まで くおう と する れんちゅう が あとをたたないにのだ

Osenbusshitsu darake - full of contamination
no - possessive
seibutsu - living thing
no - possessive
shigai - corpse
no - possessive
koori zuke - packed in ice
wo - object marker
kyogaku - great sum
no - possessive
kane - money
to - and
chi - blood
toshite - to gamble
made - until
kuou to suru - vulgar form of "try to eat"
renchuu - those guys
ga - subject marker
ato wo tatai nai - continuously / keep springing up
no - nominalizer
da - masculine form of desu

full of contamination's . living thing's . corpse's . packed in ice . (object) . great sum's . money . and . blood . to gamble . until . try to eat . those guys . (subject) . keep springing up . (turn into a phrase) . is

"These people keep springing up, that are willing to gamble large sums of money and blood in order to eat the contaminated corpses of previously living things packed in ice."

The kanji "生物" can be read as either "namamono" (raw food) or "seibutsu" (living things). In combination with "shigai" (corpse), it makes more sense to use the "seibutsu" reading.

"ato wo tatai nai" has the nuance of trying to suppress bugs. As soon as you eradicate one, two more show up. The sense here then is that while the AgMin is trying to arrest frozen food addicts and get them off the streets, it's an endless, futile task.

Instead of what I actually used in the manga, I should have gone with "These people, who are willing to gamble large sums of money and blood in order to eat the contaminated corpses of previously living things packed in ice, just keep springing up."

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And I'll put the first panel from page 7 here, because it's short.

俺には理解できない

おれ には いかい できない

ore - me
niwa - in regard to
ikai - understanding
dekinai - negative of "able to do"

me . in regard to . understanding . can not do

"I can't understand it."

This is very straightforward. "ikai dekiru" would be "able to do the act of understanding". "ikai dekinai" is therefore "unable to do the act of understanding", or "unable to understand."

I went with the more conversational "I just don't get it."

To be continued.

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